The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great

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Morris, Gerald (2008). The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great. Houghton Mifflin: New York.

How do you introduce a modern-day ten-year old, who isn’t all that keen on reading to begin with, to the legends of King Arthur and Sir Lancelot? For starters, take thirty minutes and the read them Gerald Morris’ The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great while they follow along in a copy of their own. (Or give Dad the opportunity. He will love narrating these humorous chapters in an English dialect he didn’t know he had!) Offer your kids their first tastes of Camelot, King Arthur, and the Lady of Shalott; of armour, tournaments, and “recreants”; of rescuing damsels in distress and dragon slaying. And all the while you’ll be able to reinforce the importance of afternoon naps and keeping one’s armor shiny!

This title is a perfect read aloud for grades one and up, and an excellent reader for fourth graders. Kudos to Gerald Morris for this little gem of a book.

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A Grain of Rice

Pittman, Helena Clare (1996). A Grain of Rice. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell.

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Humble farmer Pong Lo longs to marry the beautiful Princess Chang Wu, and the feeling is mutual. Unfortunately the Emperor finds the request outrageous,

“Prince!” shrieked the Emperor. “A peasant cannot be a prince! A prince must come from noble blood!” His moustache twitched madly.  (Pittman, p.4)

With his daughter’s coaxing, the Emperor concedes to the farmer’s working in the palace. The clever, cheerful, and hardworking Pong Lo more than proves himself- but it is still not enough to become the son-in-law to the highest in the land. When her father invites all of the young nobles of China in hopes of finding a suitable match for the princess, Chang Wu becomes gravely ill in her sorrow over not marrying Pong Lo.

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“With no hope of marrying Pong Lo she grew sadder and sadder until at last she only stayed in bed. Her black eyes lost their sparkle and her cheeks became pale.” (Pittman, p.20)

With his knowledge of herbs Pong Lo creates a potion to save the princess. He tells the Emperor, “It will cure the disease if the heart is willing. But you must tell the Princess that it comes from me.” The Emperor promises the farmer anything he wants if his daughter lives, but when her health is restored, and Pong Lo again requests her hand in marriage, the Emperor still will not budge. And so the clever Pong Lo requests… a grain of rice.

“But if His Majesty insists, he may double the amount every day for a hundred days.” (Pittman, p.32)

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And a lesson in multiplication is born! Pong Lo becomes the richest person in the land, and deemed acceptable to provide for the Princess Chang Wu.

A Grain of Rice is a simple, humorous story incorporating some wonderful character qualities, while making mathematics meaningful at the same time. Reading level is 4.0, but this title is very appropriate as a read aloud for early elementary students, and just plain fun for the entire family to listen to. I would recommend it as one resource for learning about Asian cultures to use with six and seven year olds, while older siblings are enjoying Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze and Where the Mountain Meets the Moon.

Jefferson’s Sons

Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker (2011). Jefferson’s Sons: A Founding Father’s Secret Children. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.

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This book fascinated me. While it is far from the first children’s book I’ve read on slavery, the uniqueness of it’s plot: what would become of the “secret” children of one of our founding fathers, coupled with the question of how a man remembered for penning the phrase “all men are created equal” did not recognize the atrocities of slavery on his own plantation, had me spellbound.

Jefferson’s Sons takes place at the turn of the nineteenth century and it’s setting is almost exclusively at his farm in Monticello. Following the death of his wife, Jefferson fathers several children with one of his slaves, Sally Hemings. (In this time period it would not have been legal for him to marry Sally, however their relationship is only portrayed positively). Four of their children survive, and the story is told in first-person narrative through the eyes of two of the sons, Beverly and Maddy, and later another young slave named Peter.

This is a serious subject, and not a light-hearted story. Bradley eases the brutality for young readers by reserving the worst atrocities it depicts for the more minor characters. Just the same the main characters are witnesses to cruelty, injustice, and pain, and express what it feels like to not be free.

As a homeschooling mom I would not recommend this book even as a read-aloud for children younger than fifth grade. Slavery is hard to understand- especially when it’s nature contradicts the rights we have to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”. But this contradiction is thought provoking, offers an excellent written response opportunity, and fits in beautifully to any pre-civil war American history curriculum. We even connected it to Mendelian genetics, if you can believe that!

Kimberly Brubaker Bradley is a wonderful writer and the author of one of my all time favorite books, The War That Saved My Life (soon to be featured on “The Homeschooling Mom’s Guide to the Best in Children’s Literature” as well). Other excellent titles by this author include Weaver’s Daughter, Ruthie’s Gift, and Halfway to the Sky.

A Gathering of Days

Blos, Joan W. (1979). A Gathering of Days: A New England Girl’s Journal, 1830-32. New York: Simon and Schuster.

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I almost titled this post “Homeschooling in Literature”, as my purpose in sharing the following excerpt with you is simply to bring a smile to your face. It is the best depiction of homeschool/homemaking multitasking I have seen in a children’s book. The following is from p. 134 of A Gathering of Days.

     “One would think it a school house-ful instead of just two girls. Mammann announced, when breakfast was cleared, that she will set the lessons for us every morning early. Then we are to have two hours to study. After that she will hear us, and provide correction. Today’s attempt- perhaps being the first- was surely comical. ‘At what age, (Catherine, my scissors, please!) was Pocahontas when Captain John Smith fell into the Indians’ hands?’ And scarcely had I answered ‘Twelve,’ but that she turned to Matty with the Moral Catechism. ‘What is justice?’ (It is giving every man his due.) ‘What is generosity?’ (It is some act of kindness performed for another which strict justice does not demand.) ‘What is gratitude?’ (Gratitude is a thankfulness of heart for favours received.) Today, however, the familiar words were mixed with exclamations. ‘Dear child, do raise up the pot!’ ‘Matty, that sauce is going to scorch!’ ‘Catherine, watch your stitches!’

Joan Blos was awarded the Newbery for her depiction of a fourteen year old New Hampshire girl’s journal in the early eighteenth century.

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Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze

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Lewis, Elizabeth Foreman (1932). Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, Inc.

Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze is a must read for any literature based history unit on the Eastern Hemisphere. As the fortieth anniversary’s book jacket describes, “Elizabeth Foreman Lewis has vividly portrayed the turmoil of Chinese life during the 1920’s”- and she has. Winner of the Newbery Medal in 1932, and translated into more than a dozen languages, this book is a perfect example of how to make learning history fun.

It is the story of a changing period in the city of Chungking as seen through they eyes of a teenage boy experiencing adventures with bandits, fire, flood, and uprisings. This book keeps moving. Through page turning historical fiction readers learn about the Chinese fears of angering spirits, and of western ideas. They learn about social classes, customs, lifestyles, foot binding- even Marxist philosophy and drug abuse. As is common in Asian children’s literature there is an emphasis on the values of humility and diligence. Following the story are additional historical notes to fill in any gaps,

Young Fu is a likeable protagonist, as is the coppersmith, Tang, to whom he is apprenticed. Fourteen when the story begins, and eighteen when it’s finished, this book is perfect for fifth through eighth graders. Young Fu’s heart is one of integrity and kindness, and young readers (and listeners) will be blessed that while he makes his share of foolish mistakes, he always learns from them.

The Great and Terrible Quest

DSC_0003Lovett, Margaret (1967) The Great and Terrible Quest. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.

For years this was my daughter’s favorite book, and sadly I was too busy with my own reading list to get to it. The Great and Terrible Quest is the story of a ten year old orphan’s adventures as he sets out to assist a wounded knight. Suffering from amnesia, his companion is plagued by knowing something of utmost importance must be done, but not knowing what that something is. Young Trad determines to protect and help him, and along the way learns about love, determination, and courage.

I love certain passages in this book especially. Huon’s adage, “What must be done, could be done” (p. 120, among other places), and the following reminiscent of Proverbs 17:22, among them:

“Trad came to believe that the times when Huon gave himself up wholly to those deep roars of mirth were like medicine, each one helping to strengthen and steady his mind,” (p.85).

And when Trad comes to the realization that  not everyone is good, Huon’s understanding and wisdom:

“His blue eyes were dark with a knowledge and grief Trad had only begun to glimpse, but steady too with courage and determination. ‘Yet you helped me, child, and the Wise Woman helped us both'” (p.73).

Trad and Huon are examples of compassion- a Christ-like character quality if ever there was one. Also, perseverance – not giving up in spite of obstacles. This is also a book about self-sacrifice. Trad, Huon, Marlo, and the Wise Woman all willingly risk their own safety, and give of their own meager possessions, to protect and help others. Finally, and not in the least, The Great and Terrible Quest is the triumphant story of a king restored, and good defeating evil: a story that shows that hidden among a despairing land are servants who persist in their hope of the true king’s return. While this book is technically not classified as Christian fiction, you’d be hard pressed to find one with a more Christian message.

For reasons unknown, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston did not reprint this masterpiece, and for a long time it was somewhat difficult to find. Rediscovered by Sonlight, it was reprinted with permission by the heir to the Margaret Lovett estate in 2008 by Avyx Inc. And I, for one, am really glad it was.

Thanks, Mike!

Farris, Michael P. (2003). The Spiritual Power of a Mother. Nashville: Broadman and Holman.

With the gracious permission of Mike Farris, current President and CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom and former President of HSLDA and Patrick Henry College, I am sharing his list, “The Top Twenty Advantages of Homeschooling“. It can be found in chapter four of The Spiritual Power of a Mother, pp.33-35, which I described to you last week as being one of my favorite books for homeschooling moms.

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“The Top Twenty Advantages of Homeschooling”

20. Your kids never tell you that their teacher is smarter than you are.

19. If you can’t find matching socks for your child first thing in the morning, who cares?

18. You never have to cancel school for snow days.

17. Your kids have good reason to think they might get spanked in school but no reason to think they might get shot.

16. If the principal gives the teacher a bad evaluation, she can stick her icy feet against his legs at night.

15. You can post the Ten Commandments on your schoolroom wall without getting sued.

14. You never have to drive your child’s forgotten lunch to school.

13. Your child will never go to their twentieth high school reunion, meet an old flame, and recklessly abandon his marriage.

12. You get to change more than diapers. You get to change their minds.

11. Your child never brings the flu home from school.

10. It’s better to be a little concerned about socialization rather than really concerned about socialism.

9. When your children talk about New Age issues, they are referring to their birthday party.

8. Since becoming a homeschooling mom, you now have the legal right to throw a blunt kitchen object (slightly grazing, but not bruising, your husband’s forehead) if he ever asks, “Why is dinner late?”

7. You never have to face the dilemma of whether to take your child’s side or the teacher’s side in a dispute at school.

6. If your child gets drugs at school it’s probably Tylenol.

5. The teacher gets to kiss the principal in the faculty lounge and no one gossips.

4. Your kids recognize that this list is numerically in reverse order.

3. Your honor student can actually read the bumper sticker that you have on your car.

2. If your child claims that the dog ate his homework, you can ask the dog.

1. Some day your children will consider you to be a miracle-working expert and will turn to you for advice.

Thanks, Mike!

For Homeschooling Moms

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There are  hundreds of books about homeschooling, but only a handful that I turn to time and time again for encouragement. Today I’d like to share with you not literature, but non-fiction: writings that not only remind me personally why I’ve chosen this journey, but also that I’m one of thousands in the trenches of training up children for the glory of God. If you aren’t familiar with these titles, keep your eyes on the lookout at your next homeschooling conference, or treat yourself wherever you buy Christian books.

The Spiritual Power of a Mother

Farris, Michael P. (2003). The Spiritual Power of a Mother. Nashville: Broadman & Holman.

Subtitled “Encouragement for the Homeschooling Mom” this collection of essays and speeches by homeschooling pioneer Mike Farris reminds moms of the powerful potential they have to influence their kids. Founder of both HSLDA and Patrick Henry College, Farris describes the sacrificial love of mothers, our responsibility to teach our children about God, and His faithfulness to finish the work he began in them. With chapter titles such as “The Dangerous Myth of the Perfect Homeschool Mom” and “The Hard Days”, he elevates the sacrifices his wife has made as he honestly describes their family’s own homeschooling journey. This book stays on my nightstand, because I can reread a pick-me-up essay in about five minutes, even if I am comatose from a long day of motherhood. And if I just need to smile I reread his “Top Twenty Advantages of Homeschooling” in chapter four.

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Home Sweet Homeschool

Maakestad, Sue. (2004). Home Sweet Homeschool: A Survivor’s Guide to Giving Your Kids a Quality Education. Grand Rapids: Revell.

With a Masters in Education I never for a minute questioned my ability to teach my kids at home- but I know the majority of homeschooling  moms are assailed with the world’s darts of “What makes you think you’re qualified to teach your kids?” With humor and intelligence, Maakestad shares the truth about just how competent you really are based on common sense, excellent examples from research, and most importantly, the Word of God. Each chapter ends with Scripture nuggets applied to the homeschooling experience, nuggets such as the following:

“Never forget to make use of your great homeschool advantages. Our kids have been given to us so we can present them back their heavenly Father. His image is stamped upon them, and it’s up to us at home to teach them from his Word about their godly heritage and calling- to birth in them a love of him and show them the more excellent way.”                                                                                                                                                                               (p.102)

And then she shares the following Scripture from Matthew 22:20:

And He said to them, “Whose image and inscription is this?”

They said to Him, “Caesar’s.”

And He said to them, “Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s,                                                                         and to God the things that are God’s.”

Sue Maakestad’s ability to defend the benefits of homeschooling using largely secular research is excellent. Her humor as she describes her own family’s experiences is a blessing, and her counsel wise. She’s the homeschooling friend you wish you could sit down with for a cup of tea or coffee and glean from her intelligent perspective.  And you can: just by opening her book.

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When You Rise Up

Sproul, R.C. Jr. (2004). When You Rise Up. New Jersey: P & R Publishing.

Don’t pick up this book if you’d rather not be homeschooling, because once you do there will be no going back.

In When You Rise Up  R.C. Sproul challenges homeschooling parents to think about the reasons they are homeschooling, and implores them to recognize that the ultimate goal should not be high academic achievement, well-behaved children, or anything else, but of turning their hearts toward God. He  even goes so far to say that it isn’t enough to know why we are choosing to instruct our children at home, but that we need to understand the motivation behind the very subjects we choose to teach. As parents we are “to talk to them about God and how he relates to everything” (p.75) and teach our children who God is, what He has done, and what He requires (p.92). This is the book to pick up if you ever find yourself second guessing your decision to educate your children yourself.

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Passionate Housewives Desperate for God

Chancey, Jennie and McDonald, Stacy. (2007-2009). Passionate Housewives Desperate for God. San Antonio: Vision Forum.

Okay the title is kind of corny, as is the book’s cover. But if, like many homeschooling moms, you are juggling a household of young children, this is a book you want to find. Jennie Chancey and Stacy McDonald are veteran homeschooling moms, both to very large families. Together they collaborated on a book dispelling the contemporary myths about homemakers, and they did a tremendous job showing feminism for what it really is. The preface alone, encourages using Scripture, what a godly “keeper at home” looks like- and it is beautifully done. Chancey and McDonald know what it’s like to be up all night with little ones, week after week. They know what it’s like to be overwhelmed, to go against the tide of culture, and to struggle with perfectionism. They have learned to embrace their sacred calling and can help young mothers do the same.

So fix yourself something warm to sip, open a book, and be encouraged. God is faithful. He will fulfill His purposes and plans, when you put your trust in Him.

Words by Heart

Sebestyen, Ouida (1979). Words by Heart. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell.

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Words by Heart is a strongly written story about forgiveness, set in the racially tense South, in the early 1900s. Twelve year old Lena’s father chooses to move his family into a white community ,where she would have more opportunities than if they remained in their African American neighborhood in Scatterbrook. In the story Lena first becomes aware that she isn’t accepted based on the color of her skin.

Lena’s father is the person she most loves and admires. He is one of the most Christ-like characters to ever grace the pages of a work of fiction, children’s or otherwise. Not only does he continually forgive his enemies, but he chooses to do what is right even when he is afraid, and points his daughter to walk in love when nothing could be more contrary to human nature.

Words by Heart is a heavy story, which is likely the reason it hasn’t found much popularity in children’s literature. It is a shamefully realistic picture of what our country was like at the turn of the century. There is little to lighten it up: the subject matter, the fear of its characters, and some language (Lena’s father’s employer does a fair amount of swearing), make it most suitable for young adult readers. Just the same, it is a book families passionate about both faith and stories shouldn’t miss: a book that teaches more about loving your enemies than this one would be hard to find.

 

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Ouida Sebestyen’s first novel (incidentally, published when she was fifty-five years old) was awarded an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, was the winner of the IRA Children’s Book Award, and A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year.

The Bears on Hemlock Mountain and The Courage of Sarah Noble

Dalgliesh, Alice (1952). The Bears on Hemlock Mountain. New York: Scribner (Simon & Schuster).

Dalgliesh, Alice (1954). The Courage of Sarah Noble. New York: Scribner (Simon & Schuster).

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Rarely are two of my favorite books for an age level by the same author, but Newbery honor books The Bears on Hemlock Mountain and The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dalgliesh are the exception.

In The Bears on Hemlock Mountain eight year old Jonathan isn’t so sure about going over the hill to fetch an iron pot from his aunt, as it is early spring:

 

“Me?” said Jonathan. “All alone? They say there are bears on Hemlock Mountain.”

“Stuff and nonsense,” said his mother. “Many’s the time I’ve been over Hemlock Mountain and not a bear did I see.”

.                                                                                               (Dalgliesh, p. 15)

 

And I’m sure you can guess what happens…

This book is just plain fun to read. Based on a Pennsylvania “tall tale”, it depicts early American culture with humor and charm, and rewards both ingenuity and bravery. With unforgettable rhythm, Jonathan and his mother keep up their courage by telling themselves, “THERE are NO BEARS ON HEMLOCK MOUNTAIN, NO BEARS, NO BEARS AT ALL”, over and over, until young listeners are reciting this along with the story. Simple, and full of faith, I never tire of reading this to my kids.

The Courage of Sarah Noble is based on the true account of an eight year old girl who came with her father into the Connecticut wilderness in 1707. Far from her mother and her large family of brothers and sisters, Sarah must face fears of wild animals, Indians, and being separated from those she loves. In just fifty-five pages Alice Dalgliesh shows young readers that “To be afraid and to be brave is the best courage of all,” (Dalgliesh, p.36).

I love how this third person narrative shows not only a child’s perspective, but a loving father’s as well. And I especially appreciate the way it shows the love of a Christian home by contrast of another:

 

“Soon we shall have a fine house like Mistress Robinson’s.”

“No,” said Sarah. “Like our own.”

“And why not like Mistress Robinsons?”

“Because there is no love in that house,” said Sarah.

“You are too wise for your years.”

(Dalgliesh, p. 14)

 

Both The Bears on Hemlock Mountain and The Courage of Sarah Noble are sure to continue inspiring Christian families for years to come.