The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great

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Morris, Gerald (2008). The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great. Houghton Mifflin: New York.

How do you introduce a modern-day ten-year old, who isn’t all that keen on reading to begin with, to the legends of King Arthur and Sir Lancelot? For starters, take thirty minutes and the read them Gerald Morris’ The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great while they follow along in a copy of their own. (Or give Dad the opportunity. He will love narrating these humorous chapters in an English dialect he didn’t know he had!) Offer your kids their first tastes of Camelot, King Arthur, and the Lady of Shalott; of armour, tournaments, and “recreants”; of rescuing damsels in distress and dragon slaying. And all the while you’ll be able to reinforce the importance of afternoon naps and keeping one’s armor shiny!

This title is a perfect read aloud for grades one and up, and an excellent reader for fourth graders. Kudos to Gerald Morris for this little gem of a book.

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A Grain of Rice

Pittman, Helena Clare (1996). A Grain of Rice. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell.

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Humble farmer Pong Lo longs to marry the beautiful Princess Chang Wu, and the feeling is mutual. Unfortunately the Emperor finds the request outrageous,

“Prince!” shrieked the Emperor. “A peasant cannot be a prince! A prince must come from noble blood!” His moustache twitched madly.  (Pittman, p.4)

With his daughter’s coaxing, the Emperor concedes to the farmer’s working in the palace. The clever, cheerful, and hardworking Pong Lo more than proves himself- but it is still not enough to become the son-in-law to the highest in the land. When her father invites all of the young nobles of China in hopes of finding a suitable match for the princess, Chang Wu becomes gravely ill in her sorrow over not marrying Pong Lo.

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“With no hope of marrying Pong Lo she grew sadder and sadder until at last she only stayed in bed. Her black eyes lost their sparkle and her cheeks became pale.” (Pittman, p.20)

With his knowledge of herbs Pong Lo creates a potion to save the princess. He tells the Emperor, “It will cure the disease if the heart is willing. But you must tell the Princess that it comes from me.” The Emperor promises the farmer anything he wants if his daughter lives, but when her health is restored, and Pong Lo again requests her hand in marriage, the Emperor still will not budge. And so the clever Pong Lo requests… a grain of rice.

“But if His Majesty insists, he may double the amount every day for a hundred days.” (Pittman, p.32)

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And a lesson in multiplication is born! Pong Lo becomes the richest person in the land, and deemed acceptable to provide for the Princess Chang Wu.

A Grain of Rice is a simple, humorous story incorporating some wonderful character qualities, while making mathematics meaningful at the same time. Reading level is 4.0, but this title is very appropriate as a read aloud for early elementary students, and just plain fun for the entire family to listen to. I would recommend it as one resource for learning about Asian cultures to use with six and seven year olds, while older siblings are enjoying Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze and Where the Mountain Meets the Moon.

Jefferson’s Sons

Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker (2011). Jefferson’s Sons: A Founding Father’s Secret Children. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.

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This book fascinated me. While it is far from the first children’s book I’ve read on slavery, the uniqueness of it’s plot: what would become of the “secret” children of one of our founding fathers, coupled with the question of how a man remembered for penning the phrase “all men are created equal” did not recognize the atrocities of slavery on his own plantation, had me spellbound.

Jefferson’s Sons takes place at the turn of the nineteenth century and it’s setting is almost exclusively at his farm in Monticello. Following the death of his wife, Jefferson fathers several children with one of his slaves, Sally Hemings. (In this time period it would not have been legal for him to marry Sally, however their relationship is only portrayed positively). Four of their children survive, and the story is told in first-person narrative through the eyes of two of the sons, Beverly and Maddy, and later another young slave named Peter.

This is a serious subject, and not a light-hearted story. Bradley eases the brutality for young readers by reserving the worst atrocities it depicts for the more minor characters. Just the same the main characters are witnesses to cruelty, injustice, and pain, and express what it feels like to not be free.

As a homeschooling mom I would not recommend this book even as a read-aloud for children younger than fifth grade. Slavery is hard to understand- especially when it’s nature contradicts the rights we have to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”. But this contradiction is thought provoking, offers an excellent written response opportunity, and fits in beautifully to any pre-civil war American history curriculum. We even connected it to Mendelian genetics, if you can believe that!

Kimberly Brubaker Bradley is a wonderful writer and the author of one of my all time favorite books, The War That Saved My Life (soon to be featured on “The Homeschooling Mom’s Guide to the Best in Children’s Literature” as well). Other excellent titles by this author include Weaver’s Daughter, Ruthie’s Gift, and Halfway to the Sky.